To many, perhaps most, Coloradans, the ballot issues are somewhat confusing.

To many, perhaps most, Coloradans, the ballot issues are somewhat confusing. A rule of thumb many find useful is to vote no if you don't understand it. That means things will remain as they are. In this year's presidential election, feelings ran high and voters reacted, said County Clerk Sharon Sisnroy. Thus there were three measures passed that affect the status quo.

Propositions 107 and 108 allowed unaffiliated voters to vote in major party primaries. Both were approved. "The result of the super ballot will be that many voters will be disenfranchised," said Sisnroy. "If they mark part of the candidates from one party and part from the other, the ballot will be thrown out." The primaries are still a function of the political party. Since the propositions are legislative in nature, the state legislature may still make changes that will allow a fairer situation.

In the case of Amendment 71, the voters approved the idea of requiring that changes to the constitution be supported by voters throughout the state. Now in order to be on the ballot, a constitutional amendment petition must have signatures from at least 2 percent of voters in every senate district. Formerly, all signatures necessary could be collected in the Denver-Boulder area. Backers of amendments argue this makes the process more difficult and costly.