Descendants of Amache "Ochinee" Prowers, visited Boggsville July 27 and July 28 of 2017 as part of the Northern and Southern Cheyenne Tribal Consultation to help develop an interruptive sign at Boggsville to tell their story.

Descendants of Amache "Ochinee" Prowers, visited Boggsville July 27 and July 28 of 2017 as part of the Northern and Southern Cheyenne Tribal Consultation to help develop an interruptive sign at Boggsville to tell their story.

Amache was born on the Great Plains of North America in the mid-1840s. Amache was the daughter of Ochinee, or Lone Bear (Nah-ku-uk-ihu-us), a Southern Cheyenne subchief, who was killed at the Sand Creek Massacre in 1864. As the daughter of a subchief, Amache would have been well trained in the arts of Cheyenne women. That social position also put her in contact with individuals who sought out her father. One of these was John Prowers, a young Anglo-American man from Missouri who traded on the Santa Fe Trail circuit and worked for William Bent at Bent's New Fort.

Amache and John Prowers were married in 1861, after which the two of them moved to the commissary at Bent's New Fort. In 1867, John and Amache Prowers moved to Boggsville and opened a store, and continued to develop the largest cattle operation in the area at that time. Boggsville represented a cultural, geographical, and economic crossroads, where the Santa Fe Trail crosses the Purgatoire River, a settlement founded by Thomas and Rumalda Boggs in 1862.

From this two-day event, locals learned about Cheyenne traditions and customs. In all, there were 11 representatives from the Northern and Cheyenne Nations, along with six representatives of the Boggsville Historical Site.

Groups at Boggsville have been working hard on replacing the existing sign panels at Boggsville, for they are very weathered and need replacing. Early on, the group decided that there was not enough information about Amache and her heritage. The group also learned they could not tell her story through historical documents alone, so they started pursuing a meeting with the Cheyenne Nation to let them tell her/their story. The Boggsville Committee would like to thank these representatives for taking time in helping them tell the story of Boggsville. They would also like to thank Judy Walden of Walden Mills Group from Denver, and Amy Webb from the National Trust from the Denver office, in putting this program together.